Candidate Forum – City Council

City Council Candidates

The Audubon Chapter of Minneapolis, Minnesota Citizens for the Protection of Migratory Birds and the Friends of Roberts Bird Sanctuary sent the following questionnaire to all the Minneapolis City Council candidates –

City Council Candidate Questionnaire

1.  Where do environmental concerns fit in the range of challenges facing Minneapolis? What are your top three environmental priorities if you are elected to the City Council?

2,  Research shows that millions of birds are killed annually by building collisions in the U.S. Would you support a policy that requires bird-friendly building design in all new buildings and renovations in Minneapolis? Why or why not?

3.  The Minneapolis City Council amended the zoning code in 2016 to require bird-safe glass in new skyway construction. Do you support extending this requirement to existing skyways when glass is replaced? Why or why not?

4.  City leaders have set a goal to increase population in Minneapolis, which will further strain the city’s natural resources. As a City Council Member, how would you ensure that water, air, and soil quality are protected and improved when development occurs?

5.  The Minneapolis City Council passed a Pollinator Resolution in 2015 to protect pollinators from pesticides and other known causes of pollinator decline. What would you do as a City Council Member to educate residents about key provisions of the Resolution, specifically the provisions urging residents not to use pesticides or purchase treated plants?

Here are their responses in order received –

David Schorn – Ward 10

1.  Where do environmental concerns fit in the range of challenges facing Minneapolis? What are your top three environmental priorities if you are elected to the City Council?

#1 Protect our Lakes within the Minnehaha Creek Watershed by requiring screens on storm drains near lakes.

#2 Protect lakeshores, rivers and park borders from high rise developments

#3 Protect waterfowl from building collisions with protective screens on buildings especially the skyways.

2.  Research shows that millions of birds are killed annually by building collisions in the U.S. Would you support a policy that requires bird-friendly building design in all new buildings and renovations in Minneapolis? Why or why not?

Yes. Especially within the migration fly patterns. The Mississippi river is a major flight route for Geese, Ducks and other migratory birds. We have the responsibility to protect these flyways.

3.  The Minneapolis City Council amended the zoning code in 2016 to require bird-safe glass in new skyway construction. Do you support extending this requirement to existing skyways when glass is replaced? Why or why not?

Absolutely. We need to extend it to new high rise buildings and multiple storied apartment complexes.

4.  City leaders have set a goal to increase population in Minneapolis, which will further strain the city’s natural resources. As a City Council Member, how would you ensure that water, air, and soil quality are protected and improved when development occurs?

First and foremost, as a city council member, I would protect our open spaces from massive development. My opponent Lisa Bender believes that any open space should be developed with high density apartments in Uptown and Whittier for which I disagree. We need more open spaces not more high rise luxury apartments. The massive development that has occurred in Uptown, has greatly affected our wildlife. This spring numerous ducks were in outdoor apartment pools in Uptown looking for places to nest. That’s a shame that we have taken away open spaces for our wildlife to nest and be safe.

5.  The Minneapolis City Council passed a Pollinator Resolution in 2015 to protect pollinators from pesticides and other known causes of pollinator decline. What would you do as a City Council Member to educate residents about key provisions of the Resolution, specifically the provisions urging residents not to use pesticides or purchase treated plants?

As a teacher I think the most important place to educate people is in the classrooms. We take our students to the Arboretum Bee Pollinator building every year to educate the kids on the importance of bees. The city could help the schools by sending them literature and speakers to talk to the kids.

The city could also post information throughout the city promoting the protection of our bee population and do seminars at landscaping and floral shops to promote pesticide free plants.

Conclusion: I grew up around lakes my entire life and now live a few blocks from Lake Bde Maka Ska. Lakes and our environment play a vital role in keeping our communities healthy and balanced. We, as city leaders, have the responsibility to make sure our lakes, rivers and soils healthy for our wildlife to survive. We owe it to our wildlife and our next generation. I swim in Bde Maka Ska daily in the summers and it is one of the most relaxing, reinvigorating things I do. I want future generations to have this opportunity as well in a healthy lake.

 

Jeremy Schroeder – Ward 11

1.  Where do environmental concerns fit in the range of challenges facing Minneapolis?

Recent fights over air quality near the Northern Metals site and HERC plant underscore the need to act decisively on environmental issues, and listen to those most affected by environmental hazards in our community. To me, sustainability isn’t just about fixing problems. It’s about working with the community to identify and pursue dynamic solutions that work for residents, businesses, and even the city’s bottom line.

It’s more pressing than ever for our city to rally behind clean energy and environmental justice, and be innovators when it comes to curbing and adapting to climate change. As our city grows, its infrastructure and ordinances must reflect our long-term priorities, including sustainability.

2.  What are your top three environmental priorities if you are elected to the City Council?

My big-picture environmental vision includes:

  • Promoting the expansion of our local clean energy economy. I would do this by engaging with the Clean Energy Partnership (in collaboration with staff and citizen leaders), exploring opportunities for the city itself to pursue renewable generation to offset its energy use, and by protecting and expanding funding mechanisms — from matching grants to inclusive financing — that support green initiatives.

  • Zoning reforms that support density, which can help individuals dramatically reduce their carbon footprints by creating walkable neighborhoods. In addition, I would like to wherever possible ensure our development guidelines promote and streamline the addition of rooftop solar and energy efficiency.

  • Supporting sustainable transportation infrastructure that enables pedestrians and cyclists as well as transit to flourish in our city. Our transportation sector is a major source of greenhouse gas emissions, and that deserves serious attention. Minneapolis has done a lot to celebrate its bike infrastructure, but we need to be careful about resting on our laurels. There is still much the city can and should do to promote multimodal transportation, in every neighborhood.

3.    Research shows that millions of birds are killed annually by building collisions in the U.S. Would you support a policy that requires bird-friendly building design in all new buildings and renovations in Minneapolis? Why or why not?

As we better understand how to design and build environmentally sound structures, our building standards should reflect that knowledge. We must be attentive to the impact our buildings have on the community, including nature. I support the exploration of such a policy, and if it came to implementation, a process that would ease the administrative burden on property owners and developers. This would both prevent negative consequences on a building’s affordability, for example, as well as help to ensure upfront compliance.

4.    The Minneapolis City Council amended the zoning code in 2016 to require bird-safe glass in new skyway construction. Do you support extending this requirement to existing skyways when glass is replaced? Why or why not?

Yes. It’s logical that if this is our policy for new construction, the bird-safe window requirement should extend to replacement components of our existing skyway system.  At the same time, it is important to me to consider where the costs land. It is important to me that this policy not negatively affect city funding for other environmental programs. My focus is first on environmental justice, ensuring those communities that have historically suffered through poor air quality, faulty infrastructure, and other pollution see long-overdue improvements and can access public health programs.

5.    City leaders have set a goal to increase population in Minneapolis, which will further strain the city’s natural resources. As a City Council Member, how would you ensure that water, air, and soil quality are protected and improved when development occurs?

Critical to Minneapolis’ growth plan are reforms to our zoning code and transportation infrastructure. We need to allow for greater density, more nimble multifamily development, and wider transit access in order to reduce the environmental costs of our growth. The city must also explore clean energy options, and promote universal access to our burgeoning clean energy economy, to reduce emissions, our overall carbon footprint, and other environmental costs of our energy system.  

6.    The Minneapolis City Council passed a Pollinator Resolution in 2015 to protect pollinators from pesticides and other known causes of pollinator decline. What would you do as a City Council Member to educate residents about key provisions of the Resolution, specifically the provisions urging residents not to use pesticides or purchase treated plants?

Protecting pollinators and all other wildlife is our shared responsibility as a community. Reducing the use of harmful pesticides and other problem practices is a huge piece of that. Many neighborhood groups around the city, including in Ward 11, list the environment and sustainability among their key priorities. Working with them is a great way to localize efforts to both boost pollinators and educate residents within their networks. I am a big believer in urban agriculture — my family keeps chickens in our backyard — and at City Hall I will do my part to elevate the visibility of sensible, sustainable living.

Ginger Jentzen – Ward 3

1.  Where do environmental concerns fit in the range of challenges facing Minneapolis?

With Trump in the White House, and a climate change denier heading up the EPA, Minneapolis City Council needs to take bold initiatives to address climate change and the environment. I support Mayor Hodges’ proposal to increase spending for environmental programs, and think we can do a lot more.

2.  What are your top three environmental priorities if you are elected to the City Council?

Shut down the HERC and implement the Zero Waste Draft Plan. In downtown Minneapolis, the HERC (Hennepin Energy Recovery Center) garbage incinerator burns over 1,000 tons of garbage collected from the entire county, much of which is entirely recyclable. There are 18 elementary schools within a 2-mile radius of the incinerator, and the fumes from the burner flow primarily into North Minneapolis and East Phillips, two communities that are inhabited predominantly by low income people and people of color.

Implement developer impact fees, an employer “head tax,” an increased tax on commercial parking lot owners, and “excise taxes” on banks, big box retailers, and franchise businesses to fully fund a world class mass transit system, expand the Complete Streets Policy, and take seriously the “Vision Zero” approach to bike and pedestrian traffic.

As the largest city in Minnesota, Minneapolis can follow cities like Seattle and San Francisco and leverage its consumer power to push for environmental justice by divesting from Wells Fargo, which is invested in DAPL, and by continuing to leverage its agreements with Xcel Energy and Centerpoint to move away from reliance on fossil fuels.

3.  Research shows that millions of birds are killed annually by building collisions in the U.S. Would you support a policy that requires bird-friendly building design in all new buildings and renovations in Minneapolis? Why or why not?

Yes absolutely, Minneapolis City Council show an example of how to prevent it through its use its powers of zoning and licensing to promote bird friendly building designs. Cities like Portland and Chicago have proposed reasonable and affordable solutions to prevent bird related deaths, though Minneapolis has unique structures like skyways at are often at flight level, and need special attention. Often simple solutions like dimming lights, types of glass, etc make a big impact, and only increase building costs by a marginal amount.

US Bank Stadium is the most deadly building for birds in Minneapolis, and receives taxpayer subsidies. The solution proposed by Audubon Minneapolis that the glass treated with a silk screen film seems totally reasonable, especially since the stadium’s glass contractor, Viracon, even manufactures such a product.

4.  The Minneapolis City Council amended the zoning code in 2016 to require bird-safe glass in new skyway construction. Do you support extending this requirement to existing skyways when glass is replaced? Why or why not?

Yes, this is entirely reasonable and would only cause tiny increases in construction and maintenance costs.

5.  City leaders have set a goal to increase population in Minneapolis, which will further strain the city’s natural resources. As a City Council Member, how would you ensure that water, air, and soil quality are protected and improved when development occurs?

I’ve publicly pledged not to take money from big developers in order to remain accountable to Ward 3 residents. I’ll work to ensure Minneapolis achieves its goal goal 100% renewable electricity for the City enterprise by 2030 (and hopefully sooner). In addition to the existing Climate Action Plan, Minneapolis can use building codes and its power of licensing to encourage increased energy efficiency, especially in apartment buildings; work to create “green zones” to improve energy conservation in high risk neighborhoods like Northeast Minneapolis; and fund lending programs for energy efficiency and other efforts. City Hall should implement the Zero Waste Draft Plan, which utilizes a combination of community education, incentives, and stronger rules for multifamily, commercial and industrial waste practices, which are currently under regulated. I will be a tireless advocate for fully implementing the Complete Streets Policy, which beyond encouraging a pedestrian friendly city, and emphases increased green space.

6.  The Minneapolis City Council passed a Pollinator Resolution in 2015 to protect pollinators from pesticides and other known causes of pollinator decline. What would you do as a City Council Member to educate residents about key provisions of the Resolution, specifically the provisions urging residents not to use pesticides or purchase treated plants?

City Council can support the grassroots organizing to make Minneapolis “bee friendly” by ensuring environmental education programs are fully funded, culturally competent, and located at appropriate times and locations for ordinary people. The grassroots campaign to address Northern Metals’ polluting practices is a model for how environmental justice needs to be linked to grassroots organizing, racial justice and community empowerment, which in the process raises awareness of the issues communities face.  It’s inspiring to see community-led campaigns, especially from communities of color, to address ongoing environmental racism around the HERC incinerator. First and foremost, I think elected officials should be tireless advocates of community-led campaigns, using their position to amplify and support on the ground organizing.

Terry White – Ward 8

1.  Where do environmental concerns fit in the range of challenges facing Minneapolis?

Minneapolis, and all cities, are at the forefront of curbing climate change. As our federal government backs away from sound environmental policy, it becomes even more imperative that cities do all they can to halt the emission of greenhouse gases.

2.  What are your top three environmental priorities if you are elected to the City Council?

A cornerstone of my campaign is the Minneapolis Climate Action Plan, passed by the city council in 2013. I will work to see that it is fully funded and implemented. Priorities include:

  1. Making residential and commercial properties more energy efficient

  2. Improving public transportation so that fewer single-passenger auto trips are needed

  3. Moving the city towards Zero Waste

    3.  Research shows that millions of birds are killed annually by building collisions in the U.S. Would you support a policy that requires bird-friendly building design in all new buildings and renovations in Minneapolis? Why or why not?

Yes, absolutely. As an outdoor enthusiast, I find it disheartening that building design does not take into account bird collisions. I would support a policy that requires bird-friendly building design.

4.  The Minneapolis City Council amended the zoning code in 2016 to require bird-safe glass in new skyway construction. Do you support extending this requirement to existing skyways when glass is replaced? Why or why not?

Yes, I support extending the requirement. I’d like to see fewer birds killed due to unnecessary collisions.

5.  City leaders have set a goal to increase population in Minneapolis, which will further strain the city’s natural resources. As a City Council Member, how would you ensure that water, air, and soil quality are protected and improved when development occurs?

First, I’d say that I am not looking to increase the population in Minneapolis, but recognize that it will increase. Long commutes from suburbs are becoming less popular as more people want to take advantage of what cities have to offer. Our built environment should meet or exceed the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and International Green Construction Code (IGCC). These codes require that buildings be more water and energy efficient. Building near public transportation hubs is important. I support loans to seniors and low-income populations to assist with improving the energy efficiency of their homes. More permeable surfaces and less concrete would help manage wastewater and reduce the amount of runoff into our lakes and streams.

6.  The Minneapolis City Council passed a Pollinator Resolution in 2015 to protect pollinators from pesticides and other known causes of pollinator decline. What would you do as a City Council Member to educate residents about key provisions of the Resolution, specifically the provisions urging residents not to use pesticides or purchase treated plants?

A City Council Member has access to city websites and email lists. I would use these promote many environmental and conservation programs offered by the city and parks. The Pollinator Resolution would be one of those I promote.

Saralyn Romanishan – Ward 10

1.  Where do environmental concerns fit in the range of challenges facing Minneapolis?

Our environment is what surrounds us, supports us, enriches us, and enables us to lead mentally and physically healthy lives which means our environment is key and must be protected.

 My mother was an organic gardener, a volunteer at the first Minneapolis Coop, the Wedge which was on our block, and a member of the Sierra Club. Canoe and camping trips in our state’s parks were a very influential part of my childhood. Therefore, the environment and wildlife are very important to me on a very personal level. I am also an organic gardener for food and native plants for bees, butterflies, and birds and I have some berry bushes that I choose not to harvest but to leave for birds as food.  I am very careful where I get my plants and seeds to ensure as much as possible that they are not chemically treated or gmo.

2.  What are your top three environmental priorities if you are elected to the City Council?

 Top Priorities

1 No more chemical (unnatural compound) pesticides and insecticides used anywhere within the city including parks and public and private property.

2 Protecting our environmental assets which include but are not limited to the Shoreland Overlays, Lakes, Parks, Boulevards, Tree Canopy, Ground Water and Water Table, Air, and increasing Urban Wildlife Habitats in new developments and properties adding additions.

3 Decreasing use of the HERC or Garbage Burner with the eventual goal of no longer needing it. This is a longterm process as the city has embedded it with the Twins Stadium and it provides power to the city.  Hennepin County has also been a supporter of keeping the HERC. Many changes need to be made in how and what we recycle, organics, and what products are sold in our city so it will be an uphill battle but it will be well worth it when we can finally eliminate the HERC.

3.  Research shows that millions of birds are killed annually by building collisions in the U.S. Would you support a policy that requires bird-friendly building design in all new buildings and renovations in Minneapolis? Why or why not?

 Yes! We need bird-safe glass.  And when we look at windpower we need to work with our local college system to develop smaller, safer turbines and with solar power we need to understand and mitigate the effects of reflection from large panels and “solar gardens”.  In addition, we need to examine how we light our city to not disrupt migration.

 4.  The Minneapolis City Council amended the zoning code in 2016 to require bird-safe glass in new skyway construction. Do you support extending this requirement to existing skyways when glass is replaced? Why or why not?

 Yes! We need birdsafe glass anywhere that we use large panels or many panels together.  Even on the street or pedestrian level this can harm birds.

5.  City leaders have set a goal to increase population in Minneapolis, which will further strain the city’s natural resources. As a City Council Member, how would you ensure that water, air, and soil quality are protected and improved when development occurs?

We need strict guidelines where we study, plan, and then build the infrastructure first. Then when development occurs, we need to ensure that our environmental assets are protected.  In addition to LEED certification for the buildings themselves, we need to require Urban Wildlife Habitats to be incorporated into the developments along with bird safe glass, effective storm water and snow removal management, and discourage the use of excess Salt in the winter with the eventual goal of elimination of salt use.

Also, when a new development occurs, the site needs to be fully mitigated, not just when it is a larger building that needs piers for support. We still have a lot of lead in our soil from so many years of leaded gas along with many other impurities and pollutants.

6.  The Minneapolis City Council passed a Pollinator Resolution in 2015 to protect pollinators from pesticides and other known causes of pollinator decline. What would you do as a City Council Member to educate residents about key provisions of the Resolution, specifically the provisions urging residents not to use pesticides or purchase treated plants?

First of all, as this is a “resolution” which means it is only a suggestion or goal with no enforcement. We need to pass real laws regarding access to and use of the chemical pesticides, insecticides, and treated plants…and seeds.  These are items that should not be available for purchase within the city limits. We also need to work with our surrounding municipalities as what happens there effects our residents and our urban wildlife.  We need to educate but we need to focus that education so it leads to legal change.

 Steve Fletcher – Ward 3

1.     Where do environmental concerns fit in the range of challenges facing Minneapolis? What are your top three environmental priorities if you are elected to the City Council?

One of the great things about Minneapolis is our natural resources. Environmental impact is one of the lenses through which all of our decisions must be viewed as a city.  My top priorities would be:

  1. Shifting our city’s consumption to 100% renewable energy, to reduce our contribution to climate change.

  2. Building smart density and transit infrastructure that lets more people live in walkable, bikeable, transit-friendly neighborhoods without owning a car, reducing fossil fuel consumption and commute times and quality of life.

  3. Improving water management, to ensure we’re keeping pollutants out of our lakes and rivers.  

 2.     Research shows that millions of birds are killed annually by building collisions in the U.S. Would you support a policy that requires bird-friendly building design in all new buildings and renovations in Minneapolis? Why or why not?

I agree with the spirit of the question, but I’d want a more specific definition of ‘bird-friendly building design’ before committing.  I supported requiring the stadium to use bird-safe glass, and I think large projects that are likely to have a large impact on nature should be the priority in implementation.  As we study the details, I’ll be interested to learn more about the benefits and costs of requiring it for smaller-scale projects – I’m cautious about any new requirements that might make renovations more costly for our naturally occurring affordable housing stock.  I would seek to find an appropriate balance between the very urgent need for affordable housing and bird-safe design.

3.     The Minneapolis City Council amended the zoning code in 2016 to require bird-safe glass in new skyway construction. Do you support extending this requirement to existing skyways when glass is replaced? Why or why not?

 I’m inclined to support this. It seems like a reasonable requirement, and an area where you can demonstrate a positive impact relative to the cost.  

 4.     City leaders have set a goal to increase population in Minneapolis, which will further strain the city’s natural resources. As a City Council Member, how would you ensure that water, air, and soil quality are protected and improved when development occurs?

Some of the biggest strains on our natural resources are related to commuting, which consumes more fossil fuels and puts more pollutants in the air than any other modern strain on the environment.  By infilling density into transit nodes and activity centers, allowing more people to live without cars, and allowing people who continue to need cars to use them less often for shorter distances, we can produce a more environmentally efficient city.  If we make an investment in shifting to renewable energy, so that whatever increase in energy consumption comes with the rising population is drawing on sustainable power, we’ll further reduce our environmental footprint.  One important shift we can make as a city, not just for new development, but for existing buildings of all sizes including single family homes is to shift toward property owners taking greater responsibility for water on their property.  We should set high standards for new developments around the inclusion of rain gardens, permeable surfaces, and other infrastructure to prevent runoff that pollutes our water.  Done right, densely populated cities consume less energy per person and do significantly less environmental damage than sprawling suburbs full of single-family homes and large yards.

 5.     The Minneapolis City Council passed a Pollinator Resolution in 2015 to protect pollinators from pesticides and other known causes of pollinator decline. What would you do as a City Council Member to educate residents about key provisions of the Resolution, specifically the provisions urging residents not to use pesticides or purchase treated plants?

 This is so important!  When I was at MN 2020, I helped produce a video on this topic in support of the resolution, which involved, in addition to researching the issue, getting up close and personal with some very active pollinators at the Bell Museum’s beekeeping facility. Pesticide reduction is an area where the city can set the tone, and provide educational opportunities with the management of our own green spaces.  Many of the candidates for Park Board are committing to remove pesticides from park maintenance and invest in sustainable park management practices. We should collaborate with the parks as they take on that work next year to help residents learn as the city improves its own park management.  I’ll also work to promote the Mississippi Watershed Management Organization’s educational opportunities, and encourage more people to become water stewards.  I’ve heard raves about that program from constituents, and appreciate that resource to help people understand where their pesticides go when they run out of the yard.

Samantha Pree-Stinson – Ward 3

1.  Where do environmental concerns fit in the range of challenges facing Minneapolis? What are your top three environmental priorities if you are elected to the City Council? 

We must be great stewards of the environment because there are many behaviors which are irreversible.  Our environment is part of our total ecosystem. Environmental issues effect the health of our residents, clean air, water and soil, as well as our economy. My priorities are to get the HERC out of Minneapolis. Burning garbage is contributing to negative health not just in North Minneapolis but surrounding communities. We need to prioritize industrial business practices to clean up Marshall and the Riverfront. We need to invest in clean green energy options such as solar, rooftop PV, wind, and make sure we do not privatize hydropower. Additionally, we need to make our environment accessible for all by completing major walking and biking pathways so that we have full connectivity and everyone has access to enjoy the river and all that it offers. I also want to make sure that we have a true zero waste plan especially when it comes to scrap metal, vinyl and plastic. Many artists are already doing this and we should partner with them and work with large corporations to set the standard for creating with zero waste design model. 

2.  Research shows that millions of birds are killed annually by building collisions in the U.S. Would you support a policy that requires bird-friendly building design in all new buildings and renovations in Minneapolis? Why or why not? 

Yes, I would. Climate change can and does have an effect on migration patters. Birds disperse seeds and pollinate our plants and flowers. Birds are a part of the environmental eco-system and we must make sure that we are recognizing the important role that they play so that we do not inadvertently start creating an imbalance. 

3.  The Minneapolis City Council amended the zoning code in 2016 to require bird-safe glass in new skyway construction. Do you support extending this requirement to existing skyways when glass is replaced? Why or why not?

Yes, I do for reasons listed in number 2. It is an environmental issue well beyond birds being beautiful to look at and hear singing. With the 277 additional trees being planted on Nicollet Mall, we will be attracting more birds and we need to ensure their safety. 

4.  City leaders have set a goal to increase population in Minneapolis, which will further strain the city’s natural resources. As a City Council Member, how would you ensure that water, air, and soil quality are protected and improved when development occurs?

We start with policy. We do not have strong environmental protections in our city and that needs to change. It is not enough to list activities in the budget. We need actual actionable tasks with milestones and projected impact to be visible and used to hold us accountable. A root cause analysis into our current short comings in this area compared to projected growth strains will help us determine the work and safety protocols. Cities grow and growth itself is not a bad thing, we just have to be proactive and start looking at impact and planning accordingly instead of our current model which is to do it retroactively. We also need to be partnering with our major healthcare providers Mayo Clinic and Abbott Northwestern/Allina, to address our current health disparities surrounding poor air quality, waste because of structural and product design, a lack of a strong marketing campaign in our city to educate our residents as to why w e need these stronger measures with short concise statements about what little things that they can do to make a lasting impact, as well as set best practices that are part of requirements for building in our city. These requirements need to be enforced. We actually have some good practices in place but they are rarely enforced and we need strong leadership that is going to make that we set the standard and enforce it to be met each and every time. 

5.  The Minneapolis City Council passed a Pollinator Resolution in 2015 to protect pollinators from pesticides and other known causes of pollinator decline. What would you do as a City Council Member to educate residents about key provisions of the Resolution, specifically the provisions urging residents not to use pesticides or purchase treated plants? 

As in my answer above, we must have a strong city wide marketing campaign that educated our residents. Everyone does not understand the role of pollinators, let alone what they can be doing to help. We should also have a program where people can drop off their pesticides and trade them in for safe solutions. Not everything is always as complicated as we think. Education and providing resources for people goes a long way and does make a difference. We focus so much on what not to do, we need to change the narrative so that we are telling people what they can/should be doing and what alternatives are available. 

Because the number of candidates is too numerous to list, we will only list the responses of the candidates who responded.